.com.unity Forums
  The Official e-Store of Shrapnel Games

This Month's Specials

Bronze- Save $7.00
Salvo- Save $7.00

   







Go Back   .com.unity Forums > The Camo Workshop > WinSPWW2 > TO&Es
Notices


Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old July 31st, 2018, 04:26 PM

Pibwl Pibwl is offline
First Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Poland
Posts: 757
Thanks: 58
Thanked 179 Times in 138 Posts
Pibwl is on a distinguished road
Default China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

Two years ago I haven't researched Chinese artillery.

I mostly used this quite reliably-looking and exhaustive list of Chinese guns https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...-t352-s10.html
Of course, if a gun is not listed there, it is not a definitive proof, but at least it's some hint, that its Chinese use is obscure and it wasn't popular.

Remarks concern Nationalist Chinese OOB21 (and communist OOB14 where indicated).

AT-guns - Japanese

16 37L46 AT-Gun - Type 1 towed AT gun was L/50 (it's been confused here with shorter Type 1 tank gun). It should use Type 1 L/50 weapon with pen=6 (weapon #12 in Japanese OOB)
A standard icon is 8035
(same for OOB14)

Units 271 - Shanghai M.31 and 272 - Armrd Truck /Gn should use worse gun, with max penetration 4 (like Japanese tank gun Type 94)

45 37L36 AT-Gun - Type 94 towed AT gun was L/46 (it's been confused here with Type 94 tank gun). It should use Type 94 L/46 weapon with pen=5 (weapon #11 in Japanese OOB).
A standard icon is 8035 (the same for both 37mm guns; a difference in barrel length was marginal)
(same for OOB14)

49 37L36 AT-Gun - the weapon is "Type 98" gun, but there wasn't such Japanese towed AT gun, only improved tank gun. In Japanese OOB there's no such towed gun (and no towed 37 mm gun with such great "sabot" ammo either).
(same for OOB14, besides it has French photo - should be 17037)

AT-guns - other

19 45L46 AT-Gun - just for a sake of consistency, a standard icon is 8022 (same for OOB14)
They were delivered by the Soviets already in late 30s (along with T-26) (now: 1/44)
(same for OOB14 - I don't know when communists acquired them)

20 76.2L51 AT-Gun - it's rather improbable, that the Soviets would deliver in 1945 pre-war obr.1936 (F-22 L/51) guns (largely lost in 1941) - most probable would be standard ZiS-3 obr.1942 (like Soviet unit 281)
However, I don't know if the Soviets delivered any own weapons to China as soon as in 1945-46, even to communists.

There is a book https://books.google.pl/books?id=oZn...0china&f=false - unfortunately it can't be read in interesting parts, but chapter on p.23 is entitled "No Soviet Weapons for Chinese Comrades"

44 20L60 AT-Gun - new icon for 20mm Madsen is 8020 (same for OOB14)
However, according to https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...-t352-s10.html , Madsens were only AA guns.

It would leave a gap in early AT guns, but apparently China had none at that time. Maybe some infantry gun should be copied.
(same for OOB14)

46 37mm AT-Gun - I don't know if the Germans delivered some L/40 guns from 1930, but in German OOB L/40 gun TaK30 (weapon #12) has penetration=5 (here 4)
Name is inconsistent with the others.
(same for OOB14)

However, according to https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...-t352-s10.html they were just typical 3.7cm PaK 35/36, supplied to China between 1936 and 1938.
(same for OOB14)

47 45L66 AT-Gun - photo is short-barrel, should be 29366 and icon 8023 (if the Soviet Union delivered weapons to China in 1946)
(same for OOB14)

50 57L73 AT-Gun - there is a doubt if they were delivered in 1945
(same for OOB14 - besides icon should be 8024)

57 47L32 AT-Gun - standard icon is 8029. Photo is improved Mod.39, it should rather be Mod.35 - picture 475
(same for OOB14)

62 37mm AT-Gun - US M3 AT gun has penetration 6 (here 4). Would they deliver them with older ammo? M74 shot seems to penetrate 5 anyway (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/37_mm_Gun_M3 - roughly similar to 37mm Bofors and Pak, probably better than Japanese Type 94, which has 5 as well)



Artillery


92 75 mm pack howitzer (pack how.) - it also could be duplicated as ordinary field howitzer: "The U.S. Lend Lease program supplied 637 of these howitzers to China from 1942, and it quickly became the most common artillery piece in use by Nationalist Chinese forces.". (https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...-t352-s10.html) They could be available earlier (now 1/43)

Icon could be changed to single-trail US 2111 (the Chinese also received 125 howitzers with split trail, but five times more with standard single-trail).

122 75mm PH Battery
- it's on-map with range 192

93 75mm M.1897 FG, 123 Bty - possibly it should be available longer (now 11/37)
(same for OOB14)

94 76.2mm Howitzer - same remarks as #20 AT gun - improbable that Soviet obr.36 were delivered.

95 75mm Tp 90 FG, 124 Bty - According to https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...-t352-s10.html, more popular were obviously captured older Type 38 guns.
(same for OOB14)

96 76mm Howitzer, 125 Bty - photo is apparently 105 mm leFH-18. Proper photo for obr.02 gun is 8799.
Range is much too big; the Soviet obr.02/30 gun has 203 (here 208).
(same for OOB14 - besides icon should be 2112)

97 80mm Skoda FG, 126 Bty - not mentioned on the quoted page - it seems that they weren't popular much for a gun that lasts from 1/30 to 44. And range 208 is sure much too big.
There is only a mention about similar 75mm Skoda M-1911, but apparently 24 only were delivered.
(same for OOB14)

Instead, it shows, that 75mm Krupp gun (or its Italian version) was more popular. Dutch 75mm 7-veld could be used.

77 mm FK-16 guns were also used (data: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7.7_cm_FK_16)

(Unit 94 could be also replaced.)

98 100mm Howitzer - there are no 100mm Howitzers on the quoted page at all. There could be 105mm leFH-16 from 1/30, eg. Romanian unit 139.
(same for OOB14)

A small number of 105mm leFH-18 were also probably delivered - "It has been reported that China took delivery of 48 of these guns during the German advisory period ca. 1936-1938."

Captured Japanese 105mm Type 91 were used from mid-thirties(?) and in bigger numbers from 1945 (Japanese unit 54)

99 105mm Howitzer - US M2A1, delivered already "from ca. 1943." (now 1/45)

100 120mm Howitzer - "M.1890" (I don't know what it is), not mentioned on the quoted page. Range 207 is too big for a howitzer. It seems, that China used first of all export Krupp 120 mm howitzer, but no doubt its range was on-map (specs are apparently similar to Dutch 12 l 12 http://www.waroverholland.nl/index.p...-mm-and-150-mm). Photo could stay, I don't know what is this.
(same for OOB14)

101 122mm Howitzer - according to https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...-t352-s10.html "small quantity" of obr.10/30 howitzers were probably delivered in late 1930s (now: 1/45). It's improbable, that the Soviets would deliver old howitzers in 1945

122mm obr.10/30 should be on-map weapon, with range 178 (Soviet weapon #74), picture 23182 and icon 2115.

116 114mm Field Gun, 119 Bty
- the quoted page doesn't mention such state-of-art British long range guns. There is only WWI 114 mm BL 4.5 inch howitzer Mk. I

129,130 120mm, 122mm Battery - as above (on-map weapon).

Last edited by Pibwl; July 31st, 2018 at 04:31 PM.. Reason: addition
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old July 31st, 2018, 06:12 PM
zovs66's Avatar

zovs66 zovs66 is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 263
Thanks: 216
Thanked 109 Times in 65 Posts
zovs66 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

I got stuff from ASL on the Chinese OOB if there was any interest.
__________________
ASL
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old July 31st, 2018, 07:29 PM

Pibwl Pibwl is offline
First Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Poland
Posts: 757
Thanks: 58
Thanked 179 Times in 138 Posts
Pibwl is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

Quote:
I got stuff from ASL on the Chinese OOB if there was any interest.
If you spotted any errors in my suggestions, or would like to add something, feel free. Personally I'm not planning to make too deep research, just relying on what's available.

Off Map Heavy Artillery

091 270mm Mortar - no mention on the quoted page. Seems, that such piece should have been significant. Photo is German 210mm morser anyway...
Quote: Extremely limited quantities of Japanese super heavy artillery weapons would have fallen into the hands of the Chinese, as there were few instances when these guns were employed by the Japanese in China. The most common and likely type to have fallen into Chinese hands would have been the 240mm Type 45 (Model of 1912) howitzer, which was the most common of the Japanese super heavy guns. Other heavy Japanese ordnance was the 240mm Type 90 (Model of 1930) railroad gun (...) Weapons like the old Krupp M-1879 280mm howitzer used during the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-1905 (this same weapon was employed by Imperial Russia as well) were long obsolete...

119,120,130 - 114mm Battery, 120mm Battery, 122mm Battery - described above - not existing in that form and on-map only. Unless we assume, that the latter one is Soviet M-30 obr.1938 howitzer delivered post-war.
[Same OOB14]

131 155mm Battery (the Long Tom) - no mention on deliveries to China of this very advanced piece on the quoted page, nor in a breakdown of foreign deliveries in Osprey New Vanguard 131 "US Field Artillery of WWII".

132 210mm Cannon - no mention on the quoted page, maybe there was some antique weapon, as photo suggests.
[Same OOB14]

197 150mm T96 Bty - OK
("Relatively smaller quantities of the more modern Schneider patterned Type 96 (Model of 1936) 150mm field howitzer were also acquired from captured or seized Japanese stocks; some of these weapons would also later show up in Korea.")

334 15cm Battery [class 10 Off Map Artillery] - maybe it should be Off Map Heavy Artillery rather? (now it's in Medium batteries). OK, only according to the quoted page they were delivered "during the German advisory period ca. 1936-1938" (now 1/35)

335 - 15cm Battery [class 10 Off Map Artillery] - as above.
The weapon is some Type 19 with 205 range, and photo is French 155 mm Mle 1917. There doesn't seem to be such thing, but from some 1943 US 155 mm M1918 howitzers were used (US unit 413, range 202, photo 30402)
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old July 31st, 2018, 08:11 PM

Pibwl Pibwl is offline
First Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Poland
Posts: 757
Thanks: 58
Thanked 179 Times in 138 Posts
Pibwl is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

I've found an excerpt from the book:
Quote:
The Soviet Union refused to deliver weapons to the Chinese CP during the Sino-Japanese War and thereby significantly damaged relations with the Chinese comrades. (...) The Chinese Communists thus had to accept the fact during the war that practically all Soviet aid between 1937 and 1941 went to the Nationalist Government. The only case of a weapons shipment from the USSR to the CCP that has become known involved 6 antiaircraft guns and 120 machine guns that were delivered in early 1943 through the KMT to Communist units in the Manchurian-Mongolian border area.
As for Soviet deliveries to Nationalists:
Quote:
The last shipment of military goods was clearly delivered in August 1941. In October 1941, the Soviet Union declared that it was no longer in a position to make further aid deliveries, because of its own war against Germany.
Unfortunately, still there's no part on eventual arms deliveries in 1945. However, another chapter says: "The Sino-Soviet Treaty of Alliance of August 14, 1945: Moscow's betrayal of Chinese Communists".
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old August 1st, 2018, 07:06 PM

Pibwl Pibwl is offline
First Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Poland
Posts: 757
Thanks: 58
Thanked 179 Times in 138 Posts
Pibwl is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

Infantry guns

102 37mm Cannon (TR mle 16 gun) - photo is eg. 9400, dedicated icon 8033.
However, there is no French 37mm infantry gun mentioned on the page https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/theo...-t352-s10.html
(same for OOB14)

There is only 37mm Skoda M.15 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3.7_cm...h%C3%BCtz_M.15) (more non-Chinese photos https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/C...h%C3%BCtz_M.15) and probably captured Japanese 37mm Type 11 from mid-30s.

108 37mm Cannon (different class) (SA17 L21 gun) - as above. Anyway, the weapon should rather be the same as 103 (towed gun was TR mle 16, SA17 was tank gun).
(same for OOB14)

103 65mm Cannon - Italian M.13 gun. The quoted page mentions only French 65mm Mle 06 used (eg. Polish unit #409, with photo 468).
Same for 109 unit.
Icons of both units should be unified (2108 is OK)
(same for OOB14)

105 75mm Cannon - photo is Type 94 mountain gun - proper photo for Type 41 mountain gun is Japanese 2433.
I suggest icon 2122, with better fits to its double trail (photos https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Type_4...m_mountain_gun)
Same for 111 unit
(same for OOB14)

106 76mm Cannon
- Soviet guns were delivered only from some 1938 (now 1/30)
(Same for 112 unit)
(same for OOB14)

120 76.2mm M1927 IG - duplicate of unit 112 in the same class, with different names, but identical specifications (and wrong icon). The only practical difference is a rifle instead of a carabine.
(same for OOB14)

76mm M1909 mountain gun might be used instead (eg. Romanian #133), but I don't know if there is a sense - they probably weren't very numerous


107 95mm Cannon
- no mention on 3.7in howitzer to be delivered by the British on the quoted page.
Same for 113 unit.
(same for OOB14)

75mm Bofors mountain gun could be copied to China from some 1933 (eg. Dutch #298, but Hogg's "Twentieth-century artillery" credits it with a range 9,300 m).

Possibly #92 75mm Pack How (most numerous Chinese gun) should be copied as infantry howitzer as well.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old August 2nd, 2018, 05:50 PM

Pibwl Pibwl is offline
First Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Poland
Posts: 757
Thanks: 58
Thanked 179 Times in 138 Posts
Pibwl is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

Armour etc

05 Vickers 6E - name should be "6-Ton" or "E" (or "E 6-Ton")

06 Type 94 Ho-Go - is "Ho-Go" name correct for Tk tankette in Chinese service?.. (same for OOB14)

017 PzKw Ia - according to German reports (in Panzertracts), they were unpacked only in June 1937 "due to insufficient organization" (now: 6/36).

58-61 Fortified House - photo isn't a house at all, closer is eg. 8884 from Italian OOB or 30233
(same for OOB14)

266 Armrd Truck - photo is unarmoured French Laffly, with portee 25mm AT gun in addition. Here is a photo of an armoured truck used in China http://www.warwheels.net/ArmoredTruc...provINDEX.html.
Better would be even Swedish 36906
Same for 272 Armrd Truck /Gn
(same for OOB14)

269 SdKfz 222 - available from 6/39. Apparently they were bought earlier, along with SdKfz 221 and Pz I (6/36 in the game). This wargaming book says 1937 https://books.google.pl/books?id=vHC...0china&f=false

271 Shanghai M.31, 272 Armrd Truck /Gn - they use too good Japanese Type 1 tank gun from early 1940s. I have no idea what gun they could have from 1930, but it should be something similar to Japanese #9 37mm Sogekiho or #13 37mm L36 Type94 at best)

289 MHarrington 4TA - "Reportedly China also ordered a quantity; it is not probable that any of these were delivered" (on non-existing anymore page http://www.warfare.altervista.org/Ma...gton/tank.html). The same says Polish article by T. Basarabowicz and this Russian article: http://tankfront.ru/allies/china/history.html.

I'll dare to refresh my earlier suggestions, to re-consider:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pibwl View Post
There at the bottom are interesting twin-turret armoured cars:
http://www.network54.com/Forum/33033...ed+Car+in+WWII
(there's a perfect icon 2717).

There should be also added Citroen-Kegresse armoured car, of unknown model, used by Wu-Peifu warlord (since 1/30? for several years). I assume, that the armament was 37mm Puteaux gun or MG. Polish unit 663 wz.28 AC could serve as a direct pattern. It should look similar to the French car on the page http://derela.pl/wz28.htm - or photo 29505 or 29508 could serve.
There is also one mysterious, but nice-looking AC
http://s40.photobucket.com/user/nuyt...8enla.jpg.html

Aircraft

393 Curtiss Hawk 75M - used in combat from 8/38 [1/37], according to Polish article on Chinese air combat (in 1937 only a single demonstrator was delivered).
Better icon seems 847 (http://www.airwar.ru/image/idop/fww2/p36/p36-3.gif) without that typical Republic wing (icon might be used, if we add P-43 Lancer)
Not listed as operational anymore in 1/44.

Some publications say, that armament was just four 7.62mm MGs, without 12.7mm MGs (typical for US ones). Three bombs doesn't seem probable (typically such aircraft carried two)

394 Nakajima Type 91 - first delivered only in 9/1934 (now 11/31)
They remained in use longer (now 6/37) - only in 7/37 they were taken over from Kwangsi aviation to central Chinese aviation - I guess until end of 1937 and arrival of Soviet aircraft at least.


396 Waco 240A - it was reportedly capable even of taking two 100 lb bombs - safely might be 2x50 lb or 4x50 lb (now it has 5x25 lb, which is very atypical number).
According to the book, they arrived only in 1/31 (now 1/30) - the earliest aircraft from 1/30 might be Breguet 14, copied from #427 level bomber.


397 Douglas O-2MC - might be copied with alternative heavier bomb load 2 x 120lb described in a book as used in action (Encyclopedia of Chinese aviation).

399,400 V-92C Corsair - MGs should be ordinary .30 or 7.7mm (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vought_O2U_Corsair) (now .50).
In #400, single 110lb bomb is very atypical load - it could carry in action 2 x 120lb, as described in a book.

408, 410 I-16 Type 10/Type 24 - according to Polish article on fighters in China (http://www.magnum-x.pl/artykul/zanim...tajace-tygrysy - I have full paper issue), first there were used I-16 Type 5 with only 2 MGs (11/37 might be).
I-16 Type 10 with 4 MGs arrived only in spring of 1938, and
I-16 with 20mm guns (type 17 and 24) - only from late 1939 (8/39?) (now 11/37)
Chinese photo https://i.pinimg.com/736x/91/c9/69/9...054da73187.jpg

414 P-51 Mustang - (precisely, P-51D) Are there known any cases of Mustang carrying four bombs? It's better to change 4x250lb to 2x500 lb, which P-51 could carry.

418, 419 P-38 Lightning - in fact they were only reconnaissance unarmed Lockheed F-5s, according to A History of Chinese Aviation... (text previously attached)

428 Fiat Br.3 - It could also take a heavier variant of 6 x 250lb or 2 x 500lb bombs (confirmed in a book). They ceased to be operational by 6/37 (now 12/40)

433 B-25b Mitchell
- there were used only D,H,J models, operational not earlier, than 1943 (now 6/42) (I had previously attached text from the book)

436 Heinkel 111B-2 - a designation was He 111K (export version of 111A). Arrived already in 8/36 (now 7/37).

437 Lockheed Hudson - used not earlier, than from 8/42 [now 8/41]

450 Douglas DC-3 - precisely, C-47, used from 1942.

That's all for OOB21

Last edited by Pibwl; August 2nd, 2018 at 05:57 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old August 2nd, 2018, 06:53 PM

Pibwl Pibwl is offline
First Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Poland
Posts: 757
Thanks: 58
Thanked 179 Times in 138 Posts
Pibwl is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

Communist China OOB14:

02 T-26 M.33 - photo is M.39, could be Chinese 4123 or Soviet 27857

05 Vickers 6E - Chinese camo photo is 2385 (like Nationalist)

56 Colt HMGs - photo is Vickers, correct is eg. 674

183 AT-Rifle (PTRD) - no deliveries of Soviet equipment before 1945 at least

285 T-26a - twin turret T-26s weren't exported and aren't known to be used by China (already removed from nationalist OOB)

288 Vickers 6-Ton - twin-turret Vickers wasn't used in China (already removed from nationalist OOB)

289 MHarrington 4TA - not used in China, especially by communists (see earlier post).

BTW: it may be doubtful, if the communists captured all kinds of nationalist tanks, before 1944-45 at least - but I have no sources...

It is also doubtful if L3 tankettes (282-286) survived until 1946 - on the other hand 290 Type 95 Ha-Go, 292 Type 97 Chi-Ha surely should be used until 12/46.

There also should be added Type 97kai Chi-Ha - unit 299 from Nationalist OOB - it was surely used.


There is a bit more known on aircraft, from Encyclopedia of Aircraft and Aviation in China until 1949. It seems, that the communists had no air forces in fact until 1945!

The first aircraft was one V-65C Corsair named Lei Ning (Lenin), captured in 3/30 and used until 7/32. The second aircraft was Douglas O-2MC named Marx, captured in 4/32. Then apparently there were none for some time.

They could replace 396 and 440 Kwangsi 3 (which wasn't produced).

"What became known as the Air Force of the PLA acquired its first aircraft by capturing Japanese machines and in addition a large number of Japanese aircraft were captured by the Russians in Manchuria and then handed over to the PLA".
There are mentioned: Ki-43 Hayabusa, Ki-44 Shoki, Ki-61 Hien, Ki-84 Hayate fighters (units 401-404), Ki-45 Toryu heavy fighter (lacking), Ki-30 (unit 405) and Ki-51 attack aircraft (lacking), Ki-48 bombers (430).

So, any Soviet aircraft before 1949 is doubtful. Some Japanese ones could have been captured earlier, but there's no specific information.

405 Mitsubishi Ki-30 - picture is Kawasaki Ki-32 (proper is 4166).

That's all for China.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old August 2nd, 2018, 07:01 PM
zovs66's Avatar

zovs66 zovs66 is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 263
Thanks: 216
Thanked 109 Times in 65 Posts
zovs66 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

CHINESE VEHICLE NOTES

During the early 1930s China possessed not a single factory capable of producing a tank, truck or airplane. Consequently, all AFV and transport vehicles were imported, leaving Chinese forces not only with a myriad of different makes and models but also highly dependent on a steady flow of parts and ammunition from the various manufacturers thousands of miles away. The first tanks to arrive in China were Renault FT-17s, 36 of which were purchased by the commander of the Manchurian Army in 1924. They were used in fighting between several of the northern warlords; later the survivors became the first tanks in the Nationalist armory, being used in Manchuria against the Japanese in 1931. It appears that when the 1937-45 War of Resistance against Japan broke out in July 1937, the Nationalists fielded three armored battalions comprising some 96 "tanks" (probably inclusive of tankettes and armored MG carriers). However, by 1938, after the fall of Shanghai and Nanjing (Nanking), more than half of them had been lost. Subsequent purchases from the Soviet Union and Italy brought the total up to about 200 by early 1941. From that time the U.S. and, to a lesser degree Britain and Commonwealth, took over as the main suppliers of war materiel to China.

Chinese ordnance nomenclature was similar to the Japanese in its use of a "Type #" dating system. However, the Chinese based theirs on the year 1911, the founding year of the Republic. Thus the Type 22 armored car dated from 1933 (22+11=33), while the Type 31 mortar was accepted in 1942. Unfortunately, most of the Chinese designations for their various types of equipment are unavailable in Western sources.

One interesting historical note, not directly relative to Chinese vehicles but nonetheless worth mentioning, is the influence of German and Soviet advisors on the Nationalist military in the 1930s. During that decade, such famous figures as von Seekt and von Falkenhausen - and later, Zhukov and Chuikov - were top military advisors to Jiang Kai-shek. The German influence, being both of longer duration and politically more akin to the beliefs of the Generalissimo, were by far the greater.


1. VCL M1931(b): This diminutive amphibious tank first appeared in 1930-32 in two slightly different versions. The British War Office designated them the A4E11 and A4E12 for testing purposes, but declined to accept them for service. They were then offered for sale abroad, and numbers were purchased by several countries including Siam and the Netherlands East Indies. The Soviet Union bought eight and from them developed the T-37 (See Russian Vehicle Note 1). China ordered twenty-nine, the last of which was delivered in May 1935. These were assigned to the 1st Tank Battalion in Shanghai where they participated in the battles for that city in 1937. The Chinese version carried a Vickers 7.92mm machine gun in its one-man turret, and had balsa-wood floats encased in sheet metal over its tracks to provide additional buoyancy. Water propulsion and steering were provided by a propeller and rudder on the rear hull. "VCL" stands for "Vickers Carden-Loyd".

The Target Size TH DRM is +3 (and also HD) if in a Water Obstacle or deep/flooded stream.

RF is 1.2 for 1937, 1.4 for 1938, and 1.6 thereafter.

2. L3/35(i): In the latter half of the 1930s Italy sold about 100 late-production L3/35 (Italian Vehicle Note 2) to China. They were still being used in 1945. Chinese L3/35 differed from the Italian standard versions by carrying different machine guns designed to fire Chinese-made ammunition. Twenty L3/35 were assigned to the 3rd Tank Battalion in Nanjing (Nanking).

If Stunned, this AFV may not regain CE status, may not fire any weapon, and is Recalled as per D5.341; these are signified by "Stun=Recall & CE FP NA" on the counter.

The BMG may be Scrounged as one or two LMG (as per D10.5), but is considered one LMG for malfunction, repair and disablement purposes.

RF is 1.2 for 1937-38, 1.3 for 1939-40, 1.4 for 1941-42, and 1.5 thereafter.

3. PzKpfw IA(g): This was the original version of the PzKpfw I (German Vehicle Note 1). A small number - perhaps as few as ten - were sold to China in the mid 1930s. Upon arrival they were assigned to the 3rd Tank Battalion in Nanjing (Nanking), where they very likely saw action in late 1937. The PzKpfw IA was felt to be underpowered for its size, due to the modest horsepower of its Krupp air-cooled gasoline engine (which had also a tendency to overheat).

RF is 1.3 for 1937, 1.5 for 1938 and 1.6 therafter.

4. Vickers 6-Ton Mk E(b): The Vickers 6-tonner was one of the more influential tank designs of the 1930s. Although not adopted by the British, it was sold (in a number of different versions) to over a dozen countries and provided the basis for the Russian T-26 (see also Chinese Vehicle Note 5) and Polish 7TP tanks. A total of twenty 6-tonners were purchased by China; sixteen of the Mark E type and four Mark F. Assigned to the 1st and 2nd Tank Battalions stationed in Shanghai, many were lost to the Japanese during the fighting around that city in 1937.

RF is 1.2 for 1937, 1.4 for 1938, and 1.6 thereafter.

5. T-26TU M33(r): In 1938-39, with tensions between the U.S.S.R. and Japan, the Soviets supplied China with eighty-eight T26 M33 tanks (Russian Vehicle Note 6). Photographic evidence indicates that they were radio-equipped; hence the TU designation in the name. They were assigned to the 1st Tank Regiment, of which at least a part was attached to the newly forming 200th Division, the only entirely motorized division in the Chinese Army. In early 1942 the 200th, along with a small number of (one source says only nine) T-26 was sent to Burma. It fought well there, but most if not all of its tanks were lost. Thereafter Chinese T-26 only saw action in China.

Each time a Mechanical Reliability DR (D2.51) is made for this AFV, an "11" result indicates that it has stalled. Its owner must then immediately make another DR, which equals the total number of Delay MP (including one MP to stop, but excluding the MP to start) that the AFV has used in the unsuccessful attempt to move. It may again attempt to move (if otherwise allowed), but must expend another MP to start - and must undergo another Stall DR as it does so. An AFV that stalls is subject to Defensive First Fire during the MPh (since it has expended a MP to Start), but no as a moving target unless it started the phase in Motion or had already entered a new hex during that phase. Should a Stall DR result in more Delay MP being expended than the AFV has available, it is considered to have expended its entire MP allotment in Delay.

Optional AAMG RF is 1.2.

Dates and RF for use in Burma are 3/42 (1.3), 4/42 (1.4), and 5/42 (1.5). RF for use in China is 1.4 for 1939-42 and 1.5 thereafter.

6. M3A3(a): In October 1943 the 1st Provisional Tank Group (Chinese-American) was formed in Ramgarth, India, using Chinese personnel and Stuart V light tanks (British Vehicle Note 4) transferred from British Land-Lease stocks. It was envisioned that the Group would eventually comprise six tank battalions, but not enough tanks could be supplied to achieve that goal, so only two were actually outfitted. Attached to X-Force, the 1st Tank Battalion, Provisional, saw action in northern Burma, while the 2nd was apparently used only for suppy-line patrol duty. Later in the 1940s these two battalions formed the core of Nationalist armour in the Chinese Civil War.

Optional AAMG RF is 1.1.

RF is 1.2 for 2-4/44 and 1.3 therafter.

7. M4A4(a): These were Sherman V medium tanks (British Vehicle Note 14) supplied by the British. The 1st Provisional Tank Group (Chinese-American) attached to X-Force in Burma contained one platoon of M4A4 to provide supporting fire, and this platoon was evidently assigned to the 1st Provisional Tank Battalion (see Chinese Vehicle Note 6).

This AFV is allowed the possibility of Multiple Hits (C3.8) even though its MA is > 40mm. Moreover, in a Gun Duel (C2.2401) its total Firer-based TH DRM are halved (FRD) prior to adding any Acquisition DRM. (The final total of all DRM may not be < zero, and applies for Gun Duel calculations only.) These abilities are signified on the counter by the ROF eing printed on a white background.

WP becomes available in June 1944 - as signified by the superscript "J4+".

Optional AAMG RF is 1.3.

RF is 1.4 for 2-4/44 and 1.5 thereafter.

8. M3A1(a): As part of their initial Land-Lease request in early 1941, the Nationalist government asked the U.S. for 400 scout cars. In October that year the first 35 M3A1s (along with 48 75mm pack howitzers), 100 .50-cal. HMGs, 500 Bren LMGs and 11,000 Tommy Guns) where shipped from New York aboard the SS Tulsa. However, in late December of that year, much of its cargo was turned over to the British at Rangoon, which leaves unclear as to how much (if any) of its cargo ever reached the Chinese. A total of 129 M3A1s were eventually Land-Leased to the Nationalists, with most (if not all) probably being used by X-Force in Burma.

This AFV starts the scenario with an inherent crew, and also with a 2-2-7 crew as a Passenger that applies to the vehicle's PP capacity (D6.1) and is additional to all 2-2-7 crews listed in the scenario OB. This AFV may retain any upossessed SW aboard it (D6.4), either of its crews may Remove either of its MG, and Mounted Fire penalties (D6.1) do not apply to its Passenger(s). ERRATA: For both the Chinese and U.S. versions of the M3A1 Scout Car, the MA is Removed as a dm .50-cal. HMG and the other MG is removed as a dm MMG.

The AAMG FP actually consists of two MG: one .50-cal. HMG (MA; 4 FP) and one secondary .30-cal. MMG (2 FP) - as signified by "rMA&[red]2" on the counter. The inherent crew may fire only the .50-cal MA unless it is malfunctioned or disabled, in which case the Inherent crew may fire the secondary AAMG instead. Otherwise, only a Good Order Passenger may use the secondary AAMG (as signified on the counter by printing its FP in red). Assuming they are properly manned, the MA AAMG and secondary AAMG may be fired together as a FG or at separate targets (as per D3.5). The secondary AAMG when being fired by a Passenger, counts as use of a support weapon by that Passenger.

Each AAMG malfunctions and is repaired or disabled independently of the other. If the MA AAMG malfunctions, mark the vehicle with a "MA Malfunction" counter to show that its secondary AAMG is still useable. If the secondary AAMG malfunctions, mark it with an "AAMG Malfunction" counter. Since the ROF applies only to the MA (A9.2), the owner must announce before he fires that he is using the MA if he wishes to possibly retain a multiple ROF. An Armor/Passenger leader may direct the fire of more than one vehicular mounted/Passenger fired MG only if those MG are firing together as a FG.

RF is 1.3 for 11/43-2/44 and 1.4 thereafter.

9. Stuart Recon(a): A small number of M3A3 tanks in the 1st Provisional Tank Group (Chinese-American) had their turret removed in order to add a slightly built-up superstructure with pintlemounted machine guns. These altered Stuarts were used as command/reconnaissance vehicles.

The MA may be fired only at a target that lies within this AFV's VCA - as signified by "MA:VCA only" on the counter. See also Chinese Vehicle Note D.

The cost for Passenger(s) to (un)load is doubled to ½ of the AFV's MP allotment and two MF for the Personnel - as signified by "(un)load ×2" on the counter. All attacks made by the Passenger(s) of this AFV are halved (or receive a +2 TH DRM) as Mounted Fire (D6.1). This AFV may retain any upossessed SW aboard it (D6.4), but its MG may not be removed.

The AAMG may be Scrounged as one or two LMG (as per D10.5), but is considered one MG for malfunction, repair and disablement purposes.

The "Scout Car" designation is given only in deference to the vehicle's historical use. For all game purposes it is treated as fully tracked.

RF is 1.5 for 11/43-2/44 and 1.6 thereafter.

10. Type 22: Both warlords and Nationalist forces converted foreign trucks into armored cars at various times. Unfortunately, very little is known about these vehicles - not even their names in most cases - and few photographs of them exist. This game piece is therefore a generic representation of such indigenously produced AFV, based on one historical type.

The CMG MA actually comprises two 2FP CMG. Each has a 360° traverse independent of the other, and thus can have its own TCA. Each has a Normal Range of eight hexes and may be Removed/Scrounged - as signified by "Nml Rng 8" and "Rmvl/Scrng OK" on the counter. The two CMG may fire at separate targets in different locations or at the same location; D3.5 applies unchanged. Each MG malfunctions, and is repaired or disabled, independently of the other. Disabled-MA Recall (D3.7) occurs only when both MG are disabled.

Whichever of the MG fires first in a phase is treated as the MA for both that attack and the remainder of that phase (treating Defensive First and Final Fire as one phase). If both fire as a FG, only one can be considered MA (and thus might retain multiple ROF); if one of them in that FG malfunctions, determine randomly whether or not it was the considered MA for that phase.

Reverse movement costs this vehicle three times its normal hex entry cost - as signified by "REV×3" on the counter.

RF is 1.5 for 1937-42 and 1.6 thereafter.

11. PSW 221(g) & PSW 222(g): A small number - perhaps a few dozen - of these armored cars (German Vehicle Notes 69 and 70), along with a few PSW 223 long-range-radio variants, were purchased from Germany in the mid 1930s. The PSW 221 was apparently the most common German armored car in Nationalist service. Some of these vehicles are reported to have been used in the 3rd Tank Battalion stationed at Nanjing (Nanking), and most likely saw action there in late 1937.

Several WW1 Lancia 1ZM armored cars (Italian Vehicle Note 19) were shipped from Italy to China in 1937, evidently intended for the Italian garrison in Tianjin (Tientsin). It is not known if any were turned over to the Chinese.

All 1MT restrictions apply in the normal manner to the PSW 221(g) [EXC: the crew must be CE to fire the CMG]; this is signified by "BU FP NA" on the counter.

The MA of the PSW 221(g), and both the MA and CMG of the PSW 222(g) have AA capability - as signified by "MA:AA" on the counter.

Reverse movement costs the PSW 221(g) four times, and the PSW 222(g) three times, its normal hex entry cost - as signified by "REV ×4" and "REV×3" on the respective counters.

PSW 221(g) RF is 1.3 for 1937, 1.4 for 1938 and 1.5 thereafter. PSW 222(g) RF is 1.4 for 1937, 1.5 for 1938, and 1.6 thereafter.

12. BA-20(r) & BA-6(r): The Nationalists purchased a small number of Soviet BA-6/BA-10/Ba20/FAI armored cars in the late 1930s. (In game terms, the BA-10 is equivalent to the BA-6 and the FAI to the BA.-20). What use Chinese made of these vehicles is unknown; however, given the scarcity of roads in the country and the poor off-road capability of these AFV, they probably saw little action outside of urban areas.

13. Mk VI Carrier(b): This tiny AFV, which utilized a Ford Model T engine and drive train, first appeared in 1927. It was designed to provide increased mobility for the Vickers MG, and could also be used to tow a light gun. Besides being adopted by British Army, several hundred were sold abroad, leading to such foreign designs as the Italian L3/35 (Chinese Vehicle Note 2) and Polish TK tankettes. 24 Mk VI carriers were ordered by China, with the first shipment arriving there in May 1929. Those still operational in the late 1930s were assigned to the 2nd Tank Battalion in Shanghai.

The VCL Mk VI is considered a Carrier (D6.8) [EXC: it has a Passenger capacity of one PP for ammunition (C10.13) or one SMC or one 1PP SW, but may not carry a Rider(s); it contains an inherent crew even if unarmed, and that original crew always takes counter form as a 2-7-7 infantry crew].

The MF expenditures given in C10.11 and C10.12 for (un)hooking a gun apply unchanged if the MMC performing that action is simultaneously (un)loading from/into this carrier.

If Stunned, this AFV may not fire and is Recalled as per D5.341; this is signified by "Stun=Recall & FP NA" on the counter.

Optional BMG RF is 1.2.

RF is 1.3 for 1937, 1.5 for 1938 and 1.6 thereafter.

14. Carriers A(b), B(b) & C(b): The British, Canadians and Australians apparently all supplied Carriers to China. Various sources state that 1,500 were provided by Australia and 1200 by Canada, but it seems unlikely that the Chinese successfully took delivery of that many prior the end of hostilities. Nor is it clear just how these Carriers were employed; however, at least one Chinese "armored Carrier" company was present in Burma in 1942, and Carriers were also used there in 1944-45 by the 1st Provisional Tank Group (Chinese-American). The use of "A", "B" and "C" in the piece names are our own designations to help differentiate between similar models.

See D6.8 for the basic rules pertaining to Carriers. Towing capability is not usable prior to 1945 - as signified by the superscript "5". If a Carrier A, B or C is to start a DYO scenario as a towing vehicle, a 2-2-27 infantry crew may be purchased for it in lieu of its inherent HS; this is done by adding two points in the "Opt BPV" column of the DYO Roster's "Vehicle" section. The MF expenditures given in C10.11 and C10.12 for (un)hooking a gun apply unchanged if the MMC performing that action is simultaneously (un)loading from/into a Carrier A, B or C.

The Carrier A's MA BMG may be repositioned as a normal MA AAMG. This can be done only by placing an AA counter on the Carrier at the end of any friendly fire phase (not MPh) in which the BMG has not fired and the Inherent MMC is not stunned, shocked, broken, or in Melee. As long as the AA counter remains on the Carrier, its FP is assumed to be "-/-/2" with a zero Multiple ROF. The AAMG may be repositioned as the BMG MA by using these same principles to remove the AA counter.

The Carrier B's BATR has a "1" multiple ROF, has a maximum TH range of 12 hexes (as signified by "[12]TH" on the counter), and may be Scrounged/Removed.

The Carrier C's MA may not be Removed, as signified by "Rmvl NA" on the counter, and may be Scrounged only as a LMG.

Carrier A(b) and Carrier B(b) Dates and RF for use in China are 1942-45 (1.6); for use in Burma they are 3-5/42 (1.5), 11/43-4/44 (1.3), and 5/44-3/45 (1.4). Carrier C(b) Dates and RF for use in China are 1943-45 (1.6); for use in Burma they are 11/43-4/44 (1.4), and 5/44-3/45 (1.5).

15. Henschel 33(g) Truck: As with so many other types of materiel, the Chinese acquired transport vehicles from many different nations (including the U.S.) during the 1930s. By 1939 there were some 7,000 German trucks alone in China, of which probably a good number were Henschel 33, a widely exported model. Due to bad roads, few spare parts and the lack of proper maintenance, vehicles in China were invariably in poor mechanical condition (as evidence in the game by the large percentage of Chinese vehicles with red MP allotments), and only a fraction of the total number were in operating condition at any one time. Moreover, no organized transport system for the army even existed. Of the more than 300 Chinese divisions, only one - the 200th - was completely motorized.

RF for use in China is 1.3 for 1937-38, 1.4 for 1939-41, 1.5 for 1942-43, and 1.6 thereafter. Dates and RF for use in Burma are 1.4 for 3-5/42 and 1.5 for 5/44-1/45.

16. Jeep(a) & 2½-Ton(a) Truck: The very first Land-Lease shipment to China, consisting of 300 2½-ton trucks, left New York in May 1941 bound for Rangoon. By the end of that year vehicles were trickling across the Chinese border via the Burma road, but bottlenecks along the route were creating a substantial backlog around Burma's capital. As a result, when the invading Japanese neared the city in March of 1942, 972 Lend-Leased trucks in various stages of assembly had to be destroyed, and 683 more plus 260 Jeeps were hurriedly transferred to British control. Once the Burma road was cut, all transport vehicles bound for China proper had to be flown over the Hump and re-assembled in Kunming. U.S. trucks and Jeeps were supplied to X-Force, and Y-Force was provided with 475 Jeeps. By the end of 1944 there were approximately 10,000 trucks in Nationalist-controlled China, but according to one estimate only about 2,000 of them were in operating condition. To make matters worse, they were dispersed among various Chinese agencies and private owners. Despite pleas from U.S. advisors, it was not until 1945 that even a half-hearted attempt was made to exercise some degree of control over motor transport for the army.

During the course of Land-Lease, a total of 24,991 trucks were released to China, comprising 11,982 of ≤ one ton (including Jeeps), 2,616 of 1½ to 2 ton, 10,230 2½ ton and 163 of > 2½-tons. It should be noted, however, that many of these probably arrived after the end of hostilities in 1945.

If armed, the Jeep has an Inherent crew and thus a CS# instead of a cs#. The Jeep's original AAMG is a .50-cal. HMG (RF 1.3) if 4 FP of a MMG (RF 1.1) if 2 FP - and may be removed (D6.631) as that type of MG (i.e., as a .50-cal. or MMG respectively).

Jeep(a) Dates and RF for use in China are 1942-43 (1.6) and 1944-45 (1.5); for use in Burma they are 3-5/42 (1.5) and 11/43-3/45 (1.3).

(2½-Ton) Dates and RF for use in China are 1942-43 (1.6) and 1944-45 (1.5); for use in Burma they are 3-5/42 (1.5) and 11/43-3/45 (1.4).

Source ASL Chapter H.
__________________
ASL
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old August 2nd, 2018, 07:08 PM
zovs66's Avatar

zovs66 zovs66 is offline
Sergeant
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Ohio
Posts: 263
Thanks: 216
Thanked 109 Times in 65 Posts
zovs66 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

CHINESE ORDNANCE NOTES


1. Type 27 Grenade Launcher: This small mortar was designed and produced in China. This designation "Type 27" indicates its acceptance for service in 1938 (1911 [founding year of the Chinese republic]+27=1938). A lever-type trigger was pulled to fire the grenade, and a two-hole gas regulator cap at the bottom of the tube bled off propellant gas for range adjustment. This weapon was not standard issue, its presence/quantity in a given unit being dependent on its availability and the commanding officer's preference.


Air Burst TEM never applies to an attack by this mortar (i.e., normal woods/jungle/bamboo TEM would apply). This is signified by "Air Bursts NA" on the counter.

2. Mortario da 45 "Brixia", 5cm IeGrW 36, 50mm RM obr. 38 & Type 89 Heavy Grenade Launcher: The Nationalists imported various types of foreign light mortars, with those from Germany ["50mm MTR(g)"], the U.S.S.R. ["50mm MTR(r)"], and Italy ["45mm MTR"] being numerically the most important. The Red Chinese received some light mortars from the Soviets, and captured (as well as clandestinely purchased) numbers of Nationalist mortars. Both also employed the Knee Mortar ["50mm MTR(j)"], which, aside from machine guns, was the most common captured Japanese support weapon in Chinese service; all that could be obtained were put to use, with the number growing as the war went on. Chinese arsenals manufactured copies of the German and Soviet weapons, plus ammunition for them (and for the Knee Mortar), while Resistance forces built a small number of Knee Mortars. Unfortunately, information on the tactical employment of these mortars is nil.

The following special rules apply to the 50mm MTR(j):

• When firing HE at a range of ≤ two hexes, the ROF is lowered to "1" for that shot and Air Bursts are NA.

• WP can be fired only at a range of 1-5 hexes, reduces the ROF to "1" for that shot, is considered Dispersed even when fired in the PFPh, and Air Bursts are NA.

• Smoke can be fired only at a range of 3-10 hexes.

• A Japanese Personnel may use it with no Captured-use penalty (and it may be fired from a cave; G11.83).

3. M2 60mm Mortar: This mortar (U.S. Ordnance Note 1) was supplied to the Chinese divisions of X-Force and Y-Force in Burma (1,238 were furnished to the latter, plus perhaps as many as 810 to X-Force), and to those that were U.S. trained-and-equipped to fight in China. In X-Force, each rifle company was authorized six M2. The game piece also represents the French 60mm mle 35 (from which the M2 was derived) and the Type 31, a Chinese copy of the French/U.S. models. The Type 31 entered production in 1942 or shortly thereafter, and 5,150 had been built by mid 1945. Total Chinese production of light mortars during the war years is estimated to have been about 12,000.

Three M2 60mm can be used as OBA as per U.S. Ordnance Note 1 and G17.5.

4. Stokes 3-in., 8cm GrW 34 & 82mm BM obr 37: The Stokes 3-in. mortar (see British Ordnance Note 2) was produced in China from 1925, being built initially in the Manchurian arsenal at Mukden, and was still being manufactured at other arsenals in 1937. The nationalist government also imported, and eventually produced its own versions of, standard German and Soviet medium mortars. Chinese arsenals produced ammunition for all these types as well. Since most Chinese divisions lacked organic field guns and howitzers, mortars were usually their sole source of artillery support. A nationalist infantry regiment generally contained a company of 6-8 medium mortars, giving the division an average of 18-32 such weapons (depending on its structure). One source states that 5242 82mm mortars were built in China between early 1941 and mid 1945. In mid 1942 some 8000 trench mortars of all sizes were in service. Aside from its different maximum range, the 82mm piece (along with its initial availability Date) also represents the French 81mm mle 27/31 and the Italian Mortaio da 81/14, small numbers of which were in Nationalists service.

5. M1 81mm & M2 4.2-in. Mortars: These mortars (U.S. Ordnance Notes 3 and 4) were used by X-Force in Burma (with perhaps as many as 80 81mm being furnished). A company of twelve 81s was authorized in each infantry regiment, while the 4.2s were formed into a non-divisional heavy mortar regiment. At the end of 1944 a number of 4.2s were shipped to China for use by U.S. trained forces, but apparently saw no action there prior the war's end. The Chinese also used captured Japanese medium mortars whenever available. In addition, by the early '40s (perhaps even earlier) they had a small number of 150mm mortars in service, but it is not clear whether these were an indigenous design (around 1930, the Mukden arsenal had produced some experimentally) or captured Japanese models.

The Area Target FP of the 4.2-in. is "12" (rather than "8"). This is signified by "12 Area FP" on the counter.

6. 3.7cm PaK 35/36 & M3A1 37mm: The PaK 35/36 (German Ordnance Note 6) was the standard AT gun of Nationalist forces. In addition to purchasing numbers of it, production facilities were imported which allowed the gun to be manufactured in China. An infantry regiment might have two such guns, but most were formed into independent AT regiments controlled at army (U.S. corps) level or higher. In mid 1942 China possessed 600 - 750 "modern" and about 250 "obsolete" AT guns. The M3A1 (U.S. Ordnance Note 6) was issued to X-Force and Y-Force divisions (189 were supplied to Y-Force and perhaps as many as 120 to X-Force) for use in Burma; each X-Force infantry regiment was authorized an eight-gun AT company. From mid 1944 a small number of M3A1 were provided to Chinese forces in southeast China.

M3A1 Dates and RF for use in China are 7/44-45 and 1.6.

7. 37mm PP obr. 15R & Cannone da 70/15: Small numbers of this WW1 infantry gun (Russian Ordnance Note 11) and pre-WW1 mountain gun (Italian Ordnance Note 7) saw service with the Chinese. However, these counters mainly represent, in a generic manner, the many diverse types of antiquated artillery pieces used in China's provincial armies.

The 70/15 may not use Target Acquisition - as signified by "Acq. NA" on the counter.

Both the 70/15 and the PP obr. 15R have a circled B# (italicized in the Listing), indicating that it suffers from Low Ammo (D3.71). This status can be negated only by SSR, an Ammo Vehicle (E10.1) or an Ammo Dump (E10.6).

8. 7.5cm Krupp M08 & Obice da 75/13: The M1908 75mm mountain gun was one of several old Krupp artillery pieces used by the Nationalists, who even produced their own version of this particular model (one source states that in the 1930s up to 54 were built by in Chinese arsenals). The game piece also represents other similar pre-WW1 guns acquired in fair numbers such as the 76mm 00/02 P (Russian Ordnance Note 13) and the 75/27 (Italian Ordnance Note 9). China also purchased some 75/13 mountain guns (Italian Ordnance Note 8); this piece is equivalent in game terms to the Krupp 7.7cm C 96 nA employed by the Nationalists, and may be used to represent the Bofors M34 mountain gun, "a batch" of which was obtained by the Nationalists. Chinese forces employed small amounts of captured Japanese mountain artillery as well. In mid 1942 the Nationalists possessed about 1,000 75mm guns and howitzers (probably inclusive of 76-77mm types as well).

9. 7.5cm IeIG 18 & 76.2mm PP obr. 27: A relatively large number of these infantry guns (German Ordnance Note 15 and Russian Ordnance Note 12) were supplied to the Nationalists, who used them primarily in the field artillery role. However, some infantry regiments - probably those in elite divisions - did contain a company of (apparently two) 75mm pieces; and given the IeIG 18's short range, it may have the weapon of choice for this role. Chinese forces also employed small numbers of captured Japanese 70mm and 75mm infantry guns.

Dates and RF for the use of these Guns in Burma are 3-5/42 (1.4) and 5/44-45 (1.5).

10. M1A1 75mm Pack Howitzer: By April 1942 the Chinese 5th Army in Burma had received about thirty U.S. pack howitzers, while others reached China at about the same time. By 1944 the M1A1 was the standard divisional artillery piece in X-Force and Y-Force, with 244 supplied to the latter and probably about sixty (tanke from British Lend-Lease stocks) to the former. The divisional artillery of an X-Force division was as single battalion of horse-packed M1A1s. Y-Force pack-howitzer battalions were generally held at army (U.S. corps) level, and detached to divisions or regiments at the need arose. (Some of the Y-Force battalions were actually man-packed; i.e., the disassembled howitzers, along with their ammunition and other accoutrements, were carried by coolies.) In China, twenty-five pack howitzer battalions were available by early 1945 to the ALPHA (a U.S. training-and-equipment program) divisions.

Dates and RF for use in Burma are 3-5/42 (1.4) and 1944-3/45 (1.3). For use in China they are 1942-6/44 (1.6) and 7/44-45 (1.5).

11. 7.7cm FK 16, 76.2mm P obr 02/30 & OQF 18-Pounder: The FK 16 was a Krupp designed field gun (FK: Feldkanone) used by the Germans in the latter half of WW1, with 3,000 being built from 1916 to 1918. The obr. 02/30 (Russian Ordnance Note 14) was an old Tsarist gun updated by the Soviets. Both types were purchased in relatively large numbers by the Nationalists. The FK 16 piece also represents the Canon de 75 mle 1897 (the famous "French 75", used in small numbers. The 18pdr (British Ordnance Note 11) was the mainstay of British artillery in WW1; some (apparently only a few) were acquired by the Nationalists. Other (evidently 75mm) pieces employed by the Nationalist forces were those of the Dutch firm Siderius. Whenever possible, Chinese forces also used captured Japanese field guns.

Almost all Chinese field artillery was organized into independent battalions and regiments controlled at army (U.S. corps) level or higher, and much of it was retained in the Central Artillery Reserve controlled by Jiang Kai-shek, who personally doled out guns as he saw fit (sometimes on or two at a time). An artillery battalion comprised two or three batteries of two to four guns each; at least in the early war years, a common battalion configuration was two 150mm and ten 75mm pieces. The total Nationalist artillery park in 1937 - 1938 has been variously estimated at 800-1,000 guns. By Sept. 1943 the total was about 1,330.

12. 10.5cm leFH 16, Cannone da 105/28 & M2A1 105mm Howitzer: The IeFH 16, a Krupp design using the same carriage as the FK 16 (Note 11 above), was the standard light field howitzer of the German Army by the end of WW1, replacing the M1898/09 which the Nationalists also possessed. The leFH 16 piece may also be used to represent the small number of foreign 105mm mountain howitzers in Nationalist service.
Note B/

The 105/28 (Italian Ordnance Note 13) was acquired by the Nationalists in relatively fair numbers - as was the leFH 18 (German Ordnance Note 20), which the 105/28 piece also represents. In addition, the Nationalists possessed a few 10cm K 18 (German Ordnance Note 21), 107mm P obr. 10/30 (Russian Ordnance Note 18), and 100/17 (Italian Ordnance Note 12), while both they and the Red Chinese captured a small number of Japanese 105mm howitzers. China's Chief of Ordnance stated in mid 1942 that his government's forces possessed a total of 91 105mm howitzers.

M2A1 howitzers (U.S. Ordnance Note 14) were supplied to X-Force, which used them in Burma. In addition, 157 were sent by aircraft (and, from the end of 1944, by truck) into China, but these apparently saw no action prior to the war's end.

leFH 16 RF for use in China is 1.5; Dates and RF for its use in Burma are 3-5/42 (1.6) and 5/44-1/45 (1.6).

13. 122mm G obr. 10/30 & G obr. 38: The U.S.S.R. supplied war materiel to China from 1924 to 1927, then again from 1938 to mid 1941 (though in a steadily decreasing trickle after Zhukov's crushing victory over the Japanese at Nomonhan in mid 1939). Among the Soviet artillery types sent to the Nationalists were obr. 10/30 and obr. 38 122mm howitzers (Russian Ordnance Notes 19 and 20), both of which were provided in fair numbers. However, when the stream of supplies from the U.S.S.R. dried up, so did the source of ammunition for most Soviet weapons, leaving their usefulness severely handicapped.

14. Obice da 149/13: The Chinese government purchased a number of these howitzers (Italian Ordnance Note 14). The game piece also represents various other WW1-era heavy howitzers such as the Krupp sFH 13 and the M1918 155mm (U.S. Ordnance Note 17). The latter was supplied in small numbers to X-Force in Burma, where it was used by elements of the Chinese 12th Field Artillery Battalion. In China the Nationalists also employed some Japanese Year-4 Type 150mm howitzers, some imported and others captured, plus a few Soviet 152mm guns/howitzers. One source states that the first use of 150mm artillery by the Chinese during the War of Resistance (i.e., the 1937-45 Sino-Japanese conflict) occurred in the fighting around Taierzhuang (Tai-erh-chuang) in early 1938. China's Chief or Ordnance stated in mid 1942 that Nationalist forces possessed 60 howitzers of "6-in." caliber.

WP is available only in scenarios set in Burma - as signified by the superscript "B".

In scenarios set in China, this gun may be towed only by a Wagon - as signified by "h-dC".

RF for use in China is 1.6. Dates and RF for use in Burma are 6/44-3/45 and 1.5.

15. Oerlikon FF, Cannone-mitragliera da 20/65 & 2cm FlaK 30: The Oerlikon was derived from a 1914 German design. Produced in Switzerland from 1921, it proved to be first successful light AA gun and was sold in large numbers to armies and navies around the world. One customer was the government in China, which purchased 120 Oerlikons in 1929. The Italians too sold 20mm AA ordnance to China, theirs being the 20/65 (Italian Ordnance Note 17). At about the same time, the Nationalists began purchasing the FlaK 30 (German Ordnance Note 25) and also arranged with German firms to have production facilities for the gun set up in China. Yet another type of 20mm AA in Nationalist service was the Madsen M35 from Denmark. 20mm AA guns were often used in the AT role, as a supplement to the standard (but sometimes unavailable) 37mm AT gun. The Chinese also obtained 12.7 - 13.2mm AAMG from France, the U.S.S.R. and the U.S.A.

Dates and RF for use in Burma are 3-5/42 (1.5) and 5/44-1/45 (1.5).

16. 3.7cm FlaK 36 o. 37 & Bofors 40mm L/60: The famed Bofors gun was purchased from Sweden, and also from Hungary where a licensed version was produced; later more were obtained from the Soviet Union, Britain and the United States. X-Force in Burma contained a battalion of Bofors 40mm, but it probably saw little action in the ground combat role. About 1937 the Nationalist government bought a number of (one source suggests 36) FlaK 36 o. 37 guns from Germany; later it apparently also received 37mm guns from the U.S.S.R. and U.S.A. Yet another type used by Nationalists was the static-mounted Vickers 40mm. AA guns were organized in independent battalions, with three batteries per battalion and four guns per battery.

Bofors Dates and RF for use in Burma are 2/44-3/45 and 1.6.

17. Bofors 75mm M29 & 8.8cm FlaK 18: These heavy AA guns were bought from Sweden and Germany. other such guns in Nationalist service were the Vickers 75mm, Soviet 76mm and Czech 90mm. Heavy AA guns were emplaced around important cities and key installations; hence they probably saw little use in ground combat. One source states that the Nationalists possessed 32 75mm AA guns in 1937; another says they had 211 AA guns of all sizes in mid 1942.

Source ASL Chapter H.
__________________
ASL
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old August 26th, 2018, 09:57 AM

Pibwl Pibwl is offline
First Lieutenant
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Poland
Posts: 757
Thanks: 58
Thanked 179 Times in 138 Posts
Pibwl is on a distinguished road
Default Re: China OOB21 and OOB14 v.11

Both OObs:

93 75mm M.1897 FG, 123 75mm M.1897 Bty - photo shows rare French split-trail modification - correct are: 8526, 8623, 9353, 23083
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©1999 - 2018, Shrapnel Games, Inc. - All Rights Reserved.